Johns Hopkins Medicine and CareFirst enter into insurance agreement

Johns Hopkins Medicine and CareFirst enter into insurance agreement

Johns Hopkins Medicine and CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield have agreed to a new multi-year contract, according to a joint statement released Wednesday. Archive video above: Hopkins Medicine may drop CareFirst in-network as negotiations continue (September 12) that more than 300,000 Marylanders who have seen a Hopkins caregiver in the past two years and have insurance CareFirst disease have been informed that they may be expelled from the network. This could have happened as early as December 5, but that’s no longer a concern with this new deal. The statement said the agreement ensures continued service to existing members and patients “while opening up new opportunities to create value for the people and communities we serve.” “No details of the agreement were immediately available in the release, but there will be no disruption to service.”We are pleased to announce that we have reached an agreement with CareFirst to keep our doctors, nurses and other caregivers in CareFirst’s network,” Theodore DeWeese, acting dean of the medical school and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in the statement. “Our goal was to reach a resolution before our patients had to make changes to their care or coverage, and we appreciate CareFirst’s collaboration in making this happen.” “Together, CareFirst and Johns Hopkins Medicine are ready to continue to provide high-quality healthcare care and maintain our focus about the people who matter most: members and patients,” said Brian Pieninck, President and CEO of CareFirst, in the release. “The impact of our partnership remains tied to advancing health outcomes in the community, and this new agreement provides the structure needed to organize our efforts and achieve this common goal.” “Our patients are our top priority. We look forward to continuing to work with CareFirst to better support the communities we serve,” said Kevin Sowers, president of Johns Hopkins Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine, in the This report will be updated.

Johns Hopkins Medicine and CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield have agreed to a new multi-year contract, according to a joint statement released Wednesday.

Archive video above: Hopkins Medicine may drop CareFirst as network as negotiations continue (September 12)

It comes after Hopkins warned last month that more than 300,000 Marylanders who have seen a Hopkins caregiver in the past two years and have CareFirst health insurance have been told they could be kicked out of the network. That could have happened as early as December 5, but that’s no longer a concern with this new deal.

The statement said the agreement ensures continued service to existing members and patients “while opening up new opportunities to create value for the people and communities we serve.”

No details of the agreement were immediately available in the release, but there will be no service disruption.

“We are pleased to announce that we have entered into an agreement with CareFirst to keep our doctors, nurses and other caregivers in the CareFirst network,” said Theodore DeWeese, acting dean of the medical school and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine. , in the press release. “Our goal was to reach a resolution before our patients had to make any changes to their care or coverage, and we appreciate CareFirst’s collaboration in making that happen.”

“Together, CareFirst and Johns Hopkins Medicine are poised to continue delivering high-quality healthcare and staying focused on the people who matter most: members and patients,” said Brian Pieninck, president and chief leadership of CareFirst, in the release. “The impact of our partnership remains tied to improving health outcomes in the community, and this new agreement provides the structure needed to organize our efforts and achieve this common goal.”

“Our patients are our top priority. We look forward to continuing to work with CareFirst to better support the communities we serve,” said Kevin Sowers, president of Johns Hopkins Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine, in the communicated.

This report will be updated.

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